The Postscript - Nov 7, 2019 - Good Pear

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My husband, Peter, and I have settled into the little house we are calling home for a month in southern Spain. The house is old and quirky—but I’ve come to believe that all homes are quirky in their own way.

Whenever I spend time in another person’s home, I realize there are a lot of different ways of doing things that would never have occurred to me. 

When I was young, my family would drive to visit my great-grandmother. She had a neighbor named Mrs. Johnson (I never learned her first name). Mrs. Johnson had a pug and when I uncurled the pug’s tail, he caught sight of it and chased it until he was exhausted. This was endlessly entertaining as an eight-year-old. But my other vivid memory of visiting Mrs. Johnson was the way she ate pears. Mrs. Johnson took the pear and banged it on the table—side to side and top to bottom—until the whole pear was soft. 

“Why are you doing that?” I asked. 

“Now you can eat the whole thing—just pull off the stem and spit out the seeds!” she told me. It turned out I’d been wasting a lot of good pear, but that stopped under Mrs. Johnson’s tutelage. 

“You shouldn’t bother that old woman!” my great-grandmother scolded me after an afternoon of eating pears and watching the pug. It didn’t occur to me until later that my great-grandmother was at least a decade older than Mrs. Johnson. (It didn’t occur to me until much later yet that this might be my great-grandmother’s way of saying she had missed me.)

While visiting my grandpa, I watched as he cut up his apple, removing the core and eating the apple in slices. I started cutting up my apples and never went back.

“He only did that because he had dentures!” my mother told me, years later. I have good teeth, but I still believe it’s a better way to eat an apple. 

I recently watched my cousin, Melissa, make a salad. She chopped up her lettuce like coleslaw. 

“Why are you doing that?” I asked. 

“It’s easier to eat and mixes with the other stuff better,” Melissa explained. 

“Why haven’t we always chopped up our lettuce?” Peter asked me, after it became our new way of doing things. 

This is what I like most about travel. It is nice to see the sights, but it is the small things, the “why didn’t I ever think of that?” things that interest me the most. Why don’t we slice up tomatoes and cheese and have them for dinner? Why don’t we buy olives in bulk? Why don’t we have one long pillow instead of two short ones? Spending time in another home makes me examine things I would never look at twice. I see the familiar with fresh eyes. I take less for granted. Travel forces me to realize how little of my life I actually think about and how much is done on autopilot. 

Returning home, I might do a few things differently but, more than anything, I am filled with a new appreciation for all I have—all the things in my life I have neglected to notice, all the sweetness I’ve taken for granted.

Yesterday I bought some fresh pears at the market. Cutting up a pear in my quirky little temporary home in Spain, I suddenly remembered Mrs. Johnson. I picked up the core and ate it. It was sweet and delicious. 

“Mrs. Johnson was right,” I thought, “I’ve been wasting a lot of good pear.”

Till next time,

Carrie

POSTSCRIPT

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The Postscript - Oct 31, 2019 - More Owls

First, I noticed the owl.  “Peter! Did you see the owl?!”  Our last Airbnb in Spain had a ceramic owl. So, when I found a similar owl—in a similarly inconvenient location—I took it as a good omen. “What owl?” my husband, Peter,... [More]

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The Postscript - Oct 24, 2019 - An Autumn Tale

My parents live in a cabin deep in the north woods. I know this sounds like the start of a fairytale. Sometimes it seems a bit like one.  There are bear in the woods. Deer run in herds. The seasons are far more pronounced and extreme than those I am used to. After a day... [More]

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The Postscript - Oct 17, 2019 - The Kind of Dog I Am

When my husband, Peter, and I met, we each had a dog.  Peter had a collie named “The Pretty Boy,” (Yes, “The” was part of his name) and I had a pound puppy, part golden retriever, part border collie mix named “Milo.” The Pretty Boy died... [More]

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The Postscript - Oct 10, 2019 - Slow Travelers

Peter and I are packing for our annual trip again.  My husband, Peter, is retired and I write, so we are able to travel now. Getting married late in life, this might have posed some problems because Peter is exactly the opposite sort of traveler I used to be. “I’m... [More]

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The Postscript - Oct 3, 2019 - Blooming Late

I realized that I might be a late bloomer—a little late, naturally. I love hearing about proteges: the five-year-old drummer or the sixteen-year-old activist. I love hearing the nine-year-old who sings like an old soul and reading about the 14-year-old who just completed... [More]

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The Postscript - Sep 26, 2019 - Forever Home

“The septic guy can’t find the cover, call him,” was the message. I’ve been getting a lot of messages like this since I decided to put my 100+ year-old farmhouse up for sale.  I haven’t lived in the farmhouse for years now—not since... [More]

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The Postscript - Sep 19, 2019 - No Coffee

Peter was up before anyone else—as he often is.  My husband, Peter, gets up early in order to have enough time to brood before busybodies like me expect him to engage in cheerful conversation. But this morning we were staying at my parents’ cabin and there... [More]

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The Postscript - Sep 12, 2019 - Marriage Stew

I told my husband, Peter, that our marriage was like stew—and that’s a good thing.  This is a second marriage for both Peter and me. We were both married for a long time and then divorced for quite a while. We dated other people and realized how tricky the... [More]

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COURT

Traffic Court up to September 2019

Turner, Philip Russell II, driving 85 mph in a 65 mph zone, deferred adjudication, court costs $108. Patton, Amanda, driving 93 mph in a 65 mph zone, deferred adjudication, court costs $108. Ramey, Tyler Ray, failure to stop or obey railroad crossing signal, fines $195, court... [More]

Wallace County District Court Sentencings

On May 15th, Vance Diamond Halsey appeared in the Wallace County District Court with court appointed attorney, Christopher Rohr, Colby for sentencing in the matter of case 2019-CR-03.  Halsey was charged with Fleeing or Attempting to Elude a Police Officer on March 12, 2019, ... [More]

Traffic Court for May-June 2019

May Traffic Report Thomas, Dyami R, Bellingham, Wash, driving 85 mph in a 65 mph zone, fines $105, court cost $108. Araujo Pompa, Almedio, Coral Gables, Fla, driving 85 mph in a 65 mph zone, fines $105, court cost $108. Lennon, Jake Owen, Pittsburg, Penn, driving 93 mph... [More]

Traffic Court for April 2019

James Manuel Phillips, Gardner, Colo, driving 77 mph in a 65 mph zone, fines $57 and court costs $108. Kenzie Marie Spreier, Colby, Kans, diving 80 in a 65 mph zone, fines $75 and court costs $108. Erick Edward Jarosz, Canon City, Colo, driving 84 mph in a 65 mph zone,... [More]

Brandon and Fugate Sentenced

Jonathan Brandon appeared in Wallace County District Court on April 10th, 2019, with his court appointed attorney, Steve Cott, Garden City, for sentencing in cases 17 CR 51 and 17 CR 58. Each case charged Brandon with Distribution of Methamphetamine within 1000 feet of a school,... [More]

Traffic Court reports Apr 11, 2019

Chandler, Garrett Scott, Pueblo, Colo, driving 75 mph in a 65 mph zone, fines $69, court costs $108. Palmier, Joshua Quayshun, Birmingham, Ala, driving 84 mph in a 65 mph zone, fines $99, court costs $108. Chavez, Brenda Icilice, Denver, Colo, driving 85 mph in a 65 mph zone,... [More]

March District Court

On March 13th, 2019 Charlene Valdez appeared in Wallace County District Court with court appointed attorney Leslie Beims, Goodland in the matter of case number 2017 CR 42. Valdez had been charged with Conspiracy to Distribute Methamphetamine, within 1,000’ of a school,... [More]

Traffic Court reports for February

Chandler, Garrett Scott, of Pueblo, Colo, cited for driving 79 mph in a 65-mph zone, ordered to pay $65 in fines and $108 in court costs. Palmier, Joshua Quayshun, of Birmingham, Ala, cited for driving 84 mph in a 65-mph zone, ordered to pay $99 in fines and $108 in court... [More]

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NEWS

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Election Results

459 registered voters (42.23%) turned in ballots for the 2019 general election. In the race for Sharon Springs Mayor, Patrick Gibbs received 109 write-in votes, Will Walker had 85 votes and Julie Samuelson received 36 write-ins.   There were 2 positions available... [More]

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Exhibition Dart Play for Upcoming Dart League!

Attention all dart players! Dart League will be starting soon. Exhibition Dart Play will take place on both November 12th and November 19th at the Sharon Springs Golf Course Clubhouse at 6pm. You do not need to be a golf member to play darts – EVERYONE is welcome –... [More]

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DD-214 Recording Drive All Month Long

For the month of November, the Register of Deeds office is holding a DD-214 Recording Drive! For those that don’t know what a DD-214 is, it’s a form, given out by all branches of military, upon the discharge of our service men and women and proves the veteran’s... [More]

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Local Farmer Directs America’s Farmers Grow Communities Donation to The Strand Theater

Each year, the America’s Farmers Grow Communities program partners with local farmers to provide grants to local nonprofits. Sponsored by the Bayer Fund, the program provides farmers the opportunity to support and give back to nonprofit organizations they care about in... [More]

2019 Wildcat Football Season Comes to an End

This past Thursday night found the Sharon Springs Wildcats ending their 2019 football season in Osborne. It was a tough night for the boys in blue but they gave it their all against the #1 state ranked Bulldogs. Once again they never quit. They showed up ready to play and left... [More]

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Halloween Spectacle 2019

Tye Poe 1st place for 2-3 grade; Braylen Bollig tie 2nd place for 2-3rd grade; Carter Cox tie 1st place for 2-3rd grade; Ty Rodosevich, Taygan Lopez and Mason Lopez tie 3rd place for 2-3rd grade. 2nd row: 4-5th grade; Blaise Fischer 3rd place tie, Kasen Stramel 2nd place tie,... [More]

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Trunk or Treat

Trunk or Treat brought the community together for chili, hot dogs, and hot cocoa and provided a safe trick or treating experience for all ages.   The Wallace County Courthouse Crew took 1st Place in the Truck or Treat contest. Trick-or-treaters were encouraged to... [More]

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WPAA to Feature Adam Gardino on Nov. 10

Since 2005 Adam Gardino has been an “up-and-coming” fingerstyle guitarist, musician and songwriter in the Pikes Peak region.  His style combines the smoothness of James Taylor and the energy of Brad Paisley to deliver exciting, jaw-dropping performances. His... [More]

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BUGLE NOTES

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Bugle Notes - Nov 7, 2019

On Saturday, the Fort Wallace Museum welcomed author Chuck Warner and his wife Karen to the Museum to discuss his new book “Birds, Bones and Beetles,” about his grandfather Charles “Bunk” Bunker, who was a KU Naturalist that explored Wallace County and... [More]

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Bugle Notes - Oct 31, 2019

The 2019 Smoky Hill Trail Conference held at the Fort Wallace Museum is now in the rearview mirror! The event hosted 75 folks, including several national names in Western History research, as the role of Fort Wallace in Trail history was explored. Tours, lectures, networking,... [More]

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Bugle Notes - Oct 17, 2019

The Smoky Hill Trail Conference weekend is here, and we are excited to host folks from all over Kansas, Colorado and beyond! The theme of the weekend is “Fort Wallace - the Fightin’est Fort on the Smoky Hill Trail,” and presentations will explore the events,... [More]

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Bugle Notes - Oct 10, 2019

This Saturday night, we are delighted to welcome Rachel Garcia and Thu Tran “The Singer and the Songwriter” to the Fort Wallace Museum for an evening of live music at 7pm as part of the High Plains Public Radio Artists Series! The Singer and The Songwriter is the... [More]

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Bugle Notes - Oct 3, 2019

The Fort Wallace Memorial Association is truly excited about the upcoming Smoky Hill Trail Conference taking place on Friday, Oct. 18 - Sunday, Oct. 20. This year’s conference theme is “Fort Wallace - the Fightin’est Fort on the Smoky Hill Trail.”... [More]

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Bugle Notes - Sep 26, 2019

For anyone that loves history, the upcoming Smoky Hill Trail Conference is not to be missed!  This 2019 Annual Conference is being held right here at the Fort Wallace Museum, on Friday, October 18th through Sunday, October 20th. The title and theme for the Conference is... [More]

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Bugle Notes - Sep 19, 2019

As fall arrives, the Fort Wallace Memorial Association is looking forward to another season of events and programming.  On October 18-20, the Museum is proud to host the 2019 Smoky Hill Trail Association Annual Conference.  This organization connects communities,... [More]

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Bugle Notes - Aug 15, 2019

In mid-August of 1869, Fort Wallace found itself in a time of transition. Some of the more immediate dangers from Indian attacks had receded, but other obstacles such as disease, and the elements still created great challenges. The building of the Kansas Pacific Railway was still... [More]

More Bugle Notes